Where Lua *is* used

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

sergei karhof
Elinks (minimalist, text-based web browser - a bit dated but nice) -
scriptable in Lua

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Pierre-Yves Gérardy
In reply to this post by sergei karhof
Moai Cloud:
a platform as a service (like Heroku) based on Mongrel2 and Lua (Tir).

The Moai SDK:
a portable[*], open source, 2D game engine. The engine is written in
C++, but you write the games in Lua. 3D is WIP.

[*]: iOS, Google Native Client (ie Chrome), Android, Windows, OS X and Linux.

-- Pierre-Yves

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Bas Groothedde
In reply to this post by sergei karhof

On 31.01.2012 20:11, sergei karhof wrote:

Ok, we now do the reverse of the previous thread.

Let's focus on where Lua *is* used ;)

help me to complete the list...

Autoplay Media Studio - AutoPlay CD/DVD Menu + Visual Software Development Tool
  You can code rather amazing Windows applications in AMS, using Lua as the scripting language.

Setup Factory - Software Installer Builder for Windows (32 & 64 Bit)
  A nice setup builder using Lua as scripting language for complex stuff.

Check it out at indigorose.com..

Downsides: Not X-Platform and not free. AMS has a free version but shows an advertisement when the application closes.

--

Bas Groothedde
Imagine Programming

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Marc Balmer
In reply to this post by sergei karhof
Am 31.01.12 20:11, schrieb sergei karhof:
> Ok, we now do the reverse of the previous thread.
>
> Let's focus on where Lua *is* used ;)
>
> I start listing the applications that I remember:

Lua will be part of the base OS install of the upcoming NetBSD 6.0
release.  Not only does NetBSD contain Lua in default base install, but
it also comes with some specific Lau bindings, e.g. to access GPIO pins
through Lua (and thus making NetBSD an ideal platform for playing and
tinkering with hardware).

Also in the base install is a Lua interface to sqlite3 (which is itself
is part of NetBSD).



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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Axel Kittenberger
In reply to this post by sergei karhof
Well that thread is what I call an self-affirming counter-overreaction
to something that only came close to something like critique.

Anyway, to inconspicuously smuggle in the listing of my own package,
this are the debian packages that depend on the vanilla-lua-VM and
include it.

$ apt-rdepends -r liblua5.1-0
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
liblua5.1-0
  Reverse Depends: aqualung (0.9~beta11-1.2)
  Reverse Depends: asc (2.4.0.0-1+b3)
  Reverse Depends: asterisk-modules (1:1.8.8.2~dfsg-1)
  Reverse Depends: awesome (3.4.11-1)
  Reverse Depends: bam (0.4.0-3)
  Reverse Depends: blobby (0.9c-1)
  Reverse Depends: blobby-server (0.9c-1)
  Reverse Depends: boswars (2.6.1-2)
  Reverse Depends: btanks (0.9.8083-3)
  Reverse Depends: celestia-glut (1.6.1+dfsg-1)
  Reverse Depends: celestia-gnome (1.6.1+dfsg-1)
  Reverse Depends: conky-std (1.8.1-6)
  Reverse Depends: crawl (2:0.9.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: crawl-tiles (2:0.9.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: crossfire-client (1.60.0-3)
  Reverse Depends: crtmpserver (0.0~dfsg+svn611.1-2)
  Reverse Depends: crtmpserver-apps (0.0~dfsg+svn611.1-2)
  Reverse Depends: crtmpserver-libs (0.0~dfsg+svn611.1-2)
  Reverse Depends: deets (0.1.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: devilspie2 (0.17-1)
  Reverse Depends: diod (1.0~pre59-1)
  Reverse Depends: ekeyd (1.1.5-2)
  Reverse Depends: freeciv-client-extras (2.3.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: freeciv-server (2.3.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: freepops (0.2.9-5)
  Reverse Depends: geany-plugin-lua (0.21.1.dfsg-1)
  Reverse Depends: gimp-gluas (0.1.20-1)
  Reverse Depends: grafx2 (2.3-1)
  Reverse Depends: gringo (3.0.3-7)
  Reverse Depends: haserl (0.9.29-3)
  Reverse Depends: hedgewars (0.9.17-1)
  Reverse Depends: highlight (3.6-1)
  Reverse Depends: httest (2.1.10-1)
  Reverse Depends: ibus-pinyin (1.4.0-1)
  Reverse Depends: imapfilter (1:2.2.3-1+b1)
  Reverse Depends: instead (1.6.0-1)
  Reverse Depends: ipe (7.1.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: libapache2-modsecurity (2.5.13-1)
  Reverse Depends: libcegui-mk2-0.7.5 (0.7.5-8)
  Reverse Depends: libcegui-mk2-1 (0.6.2-5.1)
  Reverse Depends: libcsound64-5.2 (1:5.14.2~dfsg-2)
  Reverse Depends: libdballe5 (5.10-1.1)
  Reverse Depends: libedje-bin (1.0.0-1)
  Reverse Depends: libedje1 (1.0.0-1)
  Reverse Depends: libeiskaltdcpp2.2 (2.2.5-1)
  Reverse Depends: libgv-lua (2.26.3-9)
  Reverse Depends: libhighlight-perl (3.6-1)
  Reverse Depends: libipe7.1.2 (7.1.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-0-dbg (= 5.1.4-12)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-0-dev (= 5.1.4-12)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-oocairo0 (1.4-1)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-oopango0 (1.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-rrd0 (1.4.3-3.1+b3)
  Reverse Depends: libluabind0.9.1 (0.9.1+dfsg-4)
  Reverse Depends: libluabridge-ruby1.8 (0.7.0-1)
  Reverse Depends: libquvi0 (0.2.15-1)
  Reverse Depends: librpm2 (4.9.1.1-1+b1)
  Reverse Depends: librpmio1 (4.8.1-6)
  Reverse Depends: librpmio2 (4.9.1.1-1+b1)
  Reverse Depends: libtaoframework-lua5.1-cil (2.1.svn20090801-7)
  Reverse Depends: libtokyotyrant3 (1.1.40-4.1)
  Reverse Depends: libtolua++5.1-dev (1.0.93-2)
  Reverse Depends: libtolua-dev (5.1.3-1)
  Reverse Depends: libwireshark1 (1.6.5-1)
  Reverse Depends: libwreport2 (2.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: liferea (1.6.5-1.2+b1)
  Reverse Depends: lighttpd-mod-cml (1.4.30-1)
  Reverse Depends: lighttpd-mod-magnet (1.4.30-1)
  Reverse Depends: love (0.7.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: lsyncd (2.0.5-1)
  Reverse Depends: luakit (2011.07.22-r1+1015-1)
  Reverse Depends: megaglest (3.6.0.2-2)
  Reverse Depends: monotone (1.0-3)
  Reverse Depends: mysql-proxy (0.8.1-1.1+b1)
  Reverse Depends: nbibtex (0.9.18-10)
  Reverse Depends: netpanzer (0.8.4.debian.1-1)
  Reverse Depends: nginx-extras (1.1.12-1)
  Reverse Depends: nmap (5.21-1.1)
  Reverse Depends: ocropus (0.3.1-4)
  Reverse Depends: onscripter (20120115-1)
  Reverse Depends: opendkim (2.1.3+dfsg-1+b1)
  Reverse Depends: pdns-backend-lua (3.0-1.1)
  Reverse Depends: pdns-recursor (3.3-2)
  Reverse Depends: pdns-server (3.0-1.1)
  Reverse Depends: postgresql-9.1-pllua (1:0.3.2-4)
  Reverse Depends: premake (3.7-1)
  Reverse Depends: prosody (0.8.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: quvi (0.2.15-1)
  Reverse Depends: radare-common (1:1.5.2-4+b1)
  Reverse Depends: simgrid (3.6.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: tagua (1.0~alpha2-9+b1)
  Reverse Depends: termit (2.6.0-1)
  Reverse Depends: texworks-scripting-lua (0.5~svn952-1)
  Reverse Depends: tokyotyrant (1.1.40-4.1)
  Reverse Depends: tokyotyrant-utils (1.1.40-4.1)
  Reverse Depends: ulatencyd (0.5.0-4)
  Reverse Depends: vim-athena (2:7.3.363-1)
  Reverse Depends: vim-gnome (2:7.3.363-1)
  Reverse Depends: vim-gtk (2:7.3.363-1)
  Reverse Depends: vim-nox (2:7.3.363-1)
  Reverse Depends: vlc-nox (1.1.13-1)
  Reverse Depends: weechat-plugins (0.3.6-2+b1)
  Reverse Depends: wesnoth-1.8-core (1:1.8.6-1)
  Reverse Depends: wesnoth-1.8-server (1:1.8.6-1)
  Reverse Depends: widelands (1:16-1+b1)
  Reverse Depends: wordgrinder (0.3.3-1)
  Reverse Depends: xmoto (0.5.5-1)

However,compare that to the number of packages that us the vanilla
interpreter binary and depend on that:

$ apt-rdepends -r lua5.1
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
lua5.1
  Reverse Depends: ekeyd (1.1.5-2)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-json (1.2.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-wsapi-fcgi-1 (1.5-1)
  Reverse Depends: liblua5.1-wsapi1 (1.5-1)
  Reverse Depends: lsyncd (2.0.5-1)
  Reverse Depends: lua5.1-policy-dev (33)
  Reverse Depends: luadoc (3.0.1-3)
  Reverse Depends: luarocks (2.0.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: nbibtex (0.9.18-10)
  Reverse Depends: prosody (0.8.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: shake (1.0.1-6)
  Reverse Depends: sputnik (9.03.13+1-4)
  Reverse Depends: syncmaildir (1.2.2-1)
  Reverse Depends: ulatencyd (0.5.0-4)

My package is also in this, but only because I chose to use a little
Lua script in the build process to turn the compiled object code into
a c file-const char[] array to be bound into the binary, so it's
actually not 100% correct, once installed it can do without
/usr/bin/lua.

And that difference highlights the state and strength and weakness of
the language and its ecosystem, as well all know by now.

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

David Given
In reply to this post by sergei karhof
sergei karhof wrote:
[...]
> WordGrinder is great. A nice geeky, minimalist user experience. I
> highly recommend it, try it. I just wished that it was *scriptable* in
> Lua. It certainly can be done, but it seems that the author has not
> been working on it for a while. Please, David, will you give us this
> joy?

Thanks for the kind words!

I've been thinking about it. It is, in fact, all organised internally
into plugins, so it would be easy to do. The biggest problem is the user
interface; right now the menus are defined in one huge structure, and
there's a requirement that every menu item has a unique accelerator key
(within that menu). Handling multiple plugins means I can't guarantee
that any more, and I haven't come up with a decent alternative user
interface.

--
┌─── dg@cowlark.com ───── http://www.cowlark.com ─────
│ "I have always wished for my computer to be as easy to use as my
│ telephone; my wish has come true because I can no longer figure out
│ how to use my telephone." --- Bjarne Stroustrup


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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Daniel Hertrich
CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) - An alternative firmware for many
Canon digital cameras, providing advanced features, e.g. Raw image
capability for compact cameras, live histogram, other professional
features for smaller cameras, and... Lua scripting: Enables time
lapse, motion detection, advanced bracketing, and much more.

http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Paul E. Merrell, J.D.
In reply to this post by Miles Bader-2
On Tue, Jan 31, 2012 at 7:52 PM, Miles Bader <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Rebel Neurofog <[hidden email]> writes:
>> GIMP
>
> Lua's used in the GIMP?
>
> I thought it only had scheme and python for scripts?

See <http://www.thebest3d.com/gluas/>. According to that page, also
used in three other image processing programs.

Best regards,

Paul

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Pierre-Yves Gérardy
In reply to this post by Pierre-Yves Gérardy
I forgot the URL: http://getmoai.com
-- Pierre-Yves


2012/2/1 Pierre-Yves Gérardy <[hidden email]>
Moai Cloud:
a platform as a service (like Heroku) based on Mongrel2 and Lua (Tir).

The Moai SDK:
a portable[*], open source, 2D game engine. The engine is written in
C++, but you write the games in Lua. 3D is WIP.

[*]: iOS, Google Native Client (ie Chrome), Android, Windows, OS X and Linux.

-- Pierre-Yves

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Ezequiel García-2
In reply to this post by Daniel Hertrich
Also, lua is used as a part of Ginga middleware to write interactive
digital tv applications.

http://ginga.org.br/

IMO it serves this purpose far more than well, and is very *very* overlooked by
the Ginga comunity.

There is also the possibility (experimental) to use java as an alternative.
I think this is something to think about, and may be an example of why
lua isn't so widely used: ignorance. There is some prevailing
'common-sense' that says that java is more powerful than lua, and
allows to write better interactive applications.

I have little experience on java, but I seriously doubt there is
anything (in this context, of course) that java can do, that lua
can't. But... java is big money to many, so there you go. Otherwise,
it's just plain ignorance.

Ezequiel.

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Miles Bader-2
In reply to this post by Daniel Hertrich
Daniel Hertrich <[hidden email]> writes:
> CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) - An alternative firmware for many
> Canon digital cameras, providing advanced features, e.g. Raw image
> capability for compact cameras, live histogram, other professional
> features for smaller cameras, and... Lua scripting: Enables time
> lapse, motion detection, advanced bracketing, and much more.

Wait, so you can run Lua on your point-n-shoot?!

Awesome...

-miles

--
80% of success is just showing up.  --Woody Allen

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Daniel Hertrich
On Thu, Feb 2, 2012 at 03:36, Miles Bader <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Daniel Hertrich <[hidden email]> writes:
>> CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) - An alternative firmware for many
>> Canon digital cameras, providing advanced features, e.g. Raw image
>> capability for compact cameras, live histogram, other professional
>> features for smaller cameras, and... Lua scripting: Enables time
>> lapse, motion detection, advanced bracketing, and much more.
>
> Wait, so you can run Lua on your point-n-shoot?!
>
> Awesome...

Yes, exactly. CHDK even ships with some default Lua scripts. I have
not tested or used such scripts yet, though. Have my new Canon SX230HS
for only a week now, and no time for experimenting yet ;-)

Daniel

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Peter Loveday
eyeon Fusion, a visual effects and compositing package for film and TV
production, is extensively scriptable in Lua.

In addition to scripting being used for pipeline integration, render
management and things like slate generation etc, it is also possible to
write image processing plugins ("Fuses") using Lua.

Lua scripting to Fusion can also be done via network, to automate processes
across render farms or multiple workstations.


Love, Light and Peace,
- Peter Loveday,
eyeon Software


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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Thomas Fletcher
In reply to this post by sergei karhof

On 12-01-31 2:11 PM, "sergei karhof" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>Ok, we now do the reverse of the previous thread.
>
>Let's focus on where Lua *is* used ;)

Crank Software uses Lua in its Storyboard embedded user interface design
suite:
 http://www.cranksoftware.com/storyboard

It is faster and smaller than any equivalent JavaScript solution and it's
well documented so our customers can write their own extensions to
integrate specific functionality to tie their system into their user
interface.

We run it on QNX,Linux,Android,WinCE,Win32,MacOS,FreeRTOS on a variety of
processors.

Thomas




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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Ralph Hempel-2
In reply to this post by Rebel Neurofog
Lua is used in the pbLua for LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT project.

<http://hempeldesigngroup.com/lego/pbLua/>

I'm getting ready to release the next version which is based
on the latest 5.2 release soon.

This is Lua on an ARM7 device with 256K of FLASH and 64K RAM
with an API to control the LCD, motors, buttons, and sensors
available to the NXT.

Fun to teach the kids programming or robotics, and fun for
those grownups that still play with LEGO!

It's even used in a Uni course, here:

<http://ozark.hendrix.edu/~ferrer/roboticsBook/>

I'm happy to answer any questions!


Ralph

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Florian Weimer
In reply to this post by Sam Roberts
* Sam Roberts:

> On Tue, Jan 31, 2012 at 1:52 PM, Javier Guerra Giraldez
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Tue, Jan 31, 2012 at 4:27 PM, Florian Weimer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> * Javier Guerra Giraldez:
>>>
>>>> apt (Debian package manager)
>>>
>>> I don't think so.  Where?
>
> http://apt-rpm.org/scripting.shtml

Ah.  Debian uses a different code base which doesn't include Lua support.

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Julian Suschlik
In reply to this post by sergei karhof
> Let's focus on where Lua *is* used ;)

LG SmartTVs
http://www.lg.com/global/support/opensource/opensource.jsp

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Roberto Ierusalimschy
> > Let's focus on where Lua *is* used ;)
>
> LG SmartTVs
> http://www.lg.com/global/support/opensource/opensource.jsp

Can you be more specific? I could not find any reference to Lua in
that page.

-- Roberto

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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Petite Abeille

On Feb 4, 2012, at 1:25 AM, Roberto Ierusalimschy wrote:

>>> Let's focus on where Lua *is* used ;)
>>
>> LG SmartTVs
>> http://www.lg.com/global/support/opensource/opensource.jsp
>
> Can you be more specific? I could not find any reference to Lua in
> that page.

For example, in the LG 55LW5600 Owner's Manual, under "134 OPEN SOURCE LICENSE":

"Please be informed that LG Electronics products may contain open source software listed in the tables below. License Apache license MIT license bonjour cares fontconfig libcurl libxml2 libxslt lua interpreter expat freetype libjpeg openssl libmng libpng zlib portmap pixman libicu netBSD Simple XML Parser xySSL MD5 JSON snacc MPL 1.1 "

http://www.manualowl.com/m/LG/55LW5600/Manual/193435?search=lua&x=0&y=0

TVLua! Cool!
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Re: Where Lua *is* used

Julian Suschlik
In reply to this post by Roberto Ierusalimschy
Hi,

>> LG SmartTVs
>> http://www.lg.com/global/support/opensource/opensource.jsp
>
> Can you be more specific? I could not find any reference to Lua in
> that page.

sorry no deep link but if you choose Category:TV/Projector and Model
Name: 47LV375S-ZC for example, you get a notice containing all the
licenses of the used open source software.

Julian

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