New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

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New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Jeff Pohlmeyer
This might be considered off-topic, but maybe it is worth mentioning:

  http://tinyurl.com/sputnik-dell

 - Jeff

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev
Bwt, sputnik means satellite in russian.

(I'm bulgarian, but know some russian). Definitely there are plenty of
russian folks here, so they can confirm.

On 7/23/2012 10:43 AM, Jeff Pohlmeyer wrote:
> This might be considered off-topic, but maybe it is worth mentioning:
>
>    http://tinyurl.com/sputnik-dell
>
>   - Jeff
>
>

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Michael Shalayeff
On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:03:23PM -0700, Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev wrote:
> Bwt, sputnik means satellite in russian.
>
> (I'm bulgarian, but know some russian). Definitely there are plenty
> of russian folks here, so they can confirm.

the root "put" means a road or a path.
the prefix 's' is short for "so" as in latin "co-"
(russian kaputnik... oj ;)
and suffix "nik" brings the meaning to as the doer or
the knower of the roading. thus a traveller.
since satelites like the moon and those of other planets
were already called "sputnik" so it was reused for
an artificial satelite as well.

> On 7/23/2012 10:43 AM, Jeff Pohlmeyer wrote:
> >This might be considered off-topic, but maybe it is worth mentioning:
> >
> >   http://tinyurl.com/sputnik-dell

cu
--
    paranoic mickey      (my employers have changed but, the name has remained)

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Laurent FAILLIE
In reply to this post by Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev
> Bwt, sputnik means satellite in russian.

> (I'm bulgarian, but know some russian). Definitely there are plenty of
> russian folks here, so they can confirm.

Sputnik 1 was the 1st artificial satellite made by humans and Sputnik 2 carries the 1st animal in space : Laïka
So, definitively, Sputnik made the History :)
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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
In reply to this post by Michael Shalayeff
On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:26 PM, Michael Shalayeff <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:03:23PM -0700, Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev wrote:
>> Bwt, sputnik means satellite in russian.
>>
>> (I'm bulgarian, but know some russian). Definitely there are plenty
>> of russian folks here, so they can confirm.
>
> the root "put" means a road or a path.
> the prefix 's' is short for "so" as in latin "co-"
> (russian kaputnik... oj ;)
> and suffix "nik" brings the meaning to as the doer or
> the knower of the roading. thus a traveller.
> since satelites like the moon and those of other planets
> were already called "sputnik" so it was reused for
> an artificial satelite as well.
>
>> On 7/23/2012 10:43 AM, Jeff Pohlmeyer wrote:
>> >This might be considered off-topic, but maybe it is worth mentioning:
>> >
>> >   http://tinyurl.com/sputnik-dell
>
> cu
> --
>     paranoic mickey      (my employers have changed but, the name has remained)
>

My recollection is that the English translation of Sputnik is "fellow
traveler" - it had nothing to do with "satellites", natural or
artificial. ;-)


--
Twitter: http://twitter.com/znmeb Computational Journalism Studio
http://j.mp/CompJournStudio

Data is the new coal - abundant, dirty and difficult to mine.

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev
On 7/23/2012 4:10 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:26 PM, Michael Shalayeff <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:03:23PM -0700, Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev wrote:
>>> Bwt, sputnik means satellite in russian.
>>>
>>> (I'm bulgarian, but know some russian). Definitely there are plenty
>>> of russian folks here, so they can confirm.
>>
>> the root "put" means a road or a path.
>> the prefix 's' is short for "so" as in latin "co-"
>> (russian kaputnik... oj ;)
>> and suffix "nik" brings the meaning to as the doer or
>> the knower of the roading. thus a traveller.
>> since satelites like the moon and those of other planets
>> were already called "sputnik" so it was reused for
>> an artificial satelite as well.
>>
>>> On 7/23/2012 10:43 AM, Jeff Pohlmeyer wrote:
>>>> This might be considered off-topic, but maybe it is worth mentioning:
>>>>
>>>>    http://tinyurl.com/sputnik-dell
>>
>> cu
>> --
>>      paranoic mickey      (my employers have changed but, the name has remained)
>>
>
> My recollection is that the English translation of Sputnik is "fellow
> traveler" - it had nothing to do with "satellites", natural or
> artificial. ;-)

Well then I was wrong about it. I guess I forgot all about russian then
:) - The word is nearly the same in bulgarian - sputnik (but instead of
"u" we use something between 'a' and 'u') - and yes it means fellow
traveller (lol), but it's more used nowadays more and more just for
satellite.


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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Miles Bader-2
Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev <[hidden email]> writes:
> The word is nearly the same in bulgarian - sputnik (but instead of
> "u" we use something between 'a' and 'u') - and yes it means fellow
> traveller (lol), but it's more used nowadays more and more just for
> satellite.

I like it ... it seems poetic/evocative ...

-miles

--
Scriptures, n. The sacred books of our holy religion, as distinguished from
the false and profane writings on which all other faiths are based.

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Yuri Takhteyev
In reply to this post by M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
> My recollection is that the English translation of Sputnik is "fellow
> traveler" - it had nothing to do with "satellites", natural or
> artificial. ;-)

While this word can refer to someone who travels with you, it also
more generally means something that goes together with something else
and it has been a standard term for satellite in astronomy at least as
far back as 1860s. (The Moon is described as a "sputnik" in the 1866
Dal dictionary.) This word was also used for artificial satellites
before 1957, at the time when they were just a theoretical
possibility. Though, it seems that it was mostly used in an
abbreviation: "ISZ" for "iskustvennyi sputnik Zemli" ("artificial
Earth satellite") at the time. This was used for all future satellites
- Soviet, American, whatever. When Korolev's team finally got around
to building one, they called it "Prosteishii sputnik 1" - "Basic
satellite 1". I don't think there was any creativity or poetry in this
name. It's really just about the least creative thing they could have
called it. Perhaps they were too busy building the thing to spend time
to think of "cool" names. Or perhaps they thought that whatever they
call it is going to sound cool once the thing actually flies.

  - yuri

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Dirk Laurie-2
2012/7/24 Yuri Takhteyev <[hidden email]>:
>> My recollection is that the English translation of Sputnik is "fellow
>> traveler" - it had nothing to do with "satellites", natural or
>> artificial. ;-)
>

> When Korolev's team finally got around to building one, they
> called it "Prosteishii sputnik 1" - "Basic satellite 1". I don't think
> there was any creativity or poetry in this name. It's really just
> about the least creative thing they could have called it.

The moment you use even the most commonplace word
from one language as a specialized term in another, it sounds
wildly romantic.

Like "Lua" in English.

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

eugeny gladkih
In reply to this post by M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
On 24.07.2012 3:10, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:26 PM, Michael Shalayeff <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 12:03:23PM -0700, Dimiter 'malkia' Stanev wrote:
>>> Bwt, sputnik means satellite in russian.
>>>
>>> (I'm bulgarian, but know some russian). Definitely there are plenty
>>> of russian folks here, so they can confirm.
>>
>> the root "put" means a road or a path.
>> the prefix 's' is short for "so" as in latin "co-"
>> (russian kaputnik... oj ;)
>> and suffix "nik" brings the meaning to as the doer or
>> the knower of the roading. thus a traveller.
>> since satelites like the moon and those of other planets
>> were already called "sputnik" so it was reused for
>> an artificial satelite as well.
>>
>>> On 7/23/2012 10:43 AM, Jeff Pohlmeyer wrote:
>>>> This might be considered off-topic, but maybe it is worth mentioning:
>>>>
>>>>    http://tinyurl.com/sputnik-dell
>>
>> cu
>> --
>>      paranoic mickey      (my employers have changed but, the name has remained)
>>
>
> My recollection is that the English translation of Sputnik is "fellow
> traveler" - it had nothing to do with "satellites", natural or
> artificial. ;-)
>

that's pretty right.


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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Pierpaolo Bernardi
In reply to this post by M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
On Tue, Jul 24, 2012 at 1:10 AM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <[hidden email]> wrote:

> My recollection is that the English translation of Sputnik is "fellow
> traveler" - it had nothing to do with "satellites", natural or
> artificial. ;-)

It has all to do with satellites.

Satellite means exactly the same thing (fellow traveller) but in latin.

The russian word is an exact literal translation of the latin word.

Пока
P.

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Leo Razoumov
In reply to this post by Yuri Takhteyev
On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 11:50 PM, Yuri Takhteyev <[hidden email]> wrote:
> When Korolev's team finally got around
> to building one, they called it "Prosteishii sputnik 1" - "Basic
> satellite 1".

It is summer time (in the Northern hemisphere) and some people might
have spare time while on vacation.
A good book on the history of the Russian Space Program was translated
in English and is available at Amazon for $1.99/volume

Boris Chertok "Rockets and People - Volume I [Kindle Edition]" for $1.99
http://www.amazon.com/Rockets-People-Volume-I-ebook/dp/B0075GLYQG/
There are also volumes 2,3 and 4.

The whole Sputnik 1 launch was very ad-hoc and to a some degree an act
of desperation. The previous tests revealed that the military payload
that R-7 ICBMs were supposed to carry was disintegrating on reentry
into dense atmosphere. To buy time to redesign the payload shield and
to deflect the criticism Sergey Korolev decided to try payload that
only goes up and does not need to get down. The rest is the History...

--Leo--

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
On Tue, Jul 24, 2012 at 2:50 PM, Leo Razoumov <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 11:50 PM, Yuri Takhteyev <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> When Korolev's team finally got around
>> to building one, they called it "Prosteishii sputnik 1" - "Basic
>> satellite 1".
>
> It is summer time (in the Northern hemisphere) and some people might
> have spare time while on vacation.
> A good book on the history of the Russian Space Program was translated
> in English and is available at Amazon for $1.99/volume
>
> Boris Chertok "Rockets and People - Volume I [Kindle Edition]" for $1.99
> http://www.amazon.com/Rockets-People-Volume-I-ebook/dp/B0075GLYQG/
> There are also volumes 2,3 and 4.
>
> The whole Sputnik 1 launch was very ad-hoc and to a some degree an act
> of desperation. The previous tests revealed that the military payload
> that R-7 ICBMs were supposed to carry was disintegrating on reentry
> into dense atmosphere. To buy time to redesign the payload shield and
> to deflect the criticism Sergey Korolev decided to try payload that
> only goes up and does not need to get down. The rest is the History...
>
> --Leo--
>

So the Russians were desperate too? Who knew? ;-) It was absolute
chaos here in the USA after the first failed Vanguard launch. For once
in our history, Congress actually took positive action!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Defense_Education_Act

--
Twitter: http://twitter.com/znmeb Computational Journalism Studio
http://j.mp/CompJournStudio

Data is the new coal - abundant, dirty and difficult to mine.

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

KHMan
In reply to this post by Leo Razoumov
On 7/25/2012 5:50 AM, Leo Razoumov wrote:

> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 11:50 PM, Yuri Takhteyev wrote:
>> When Korolev's team finally got around
>> to building one, they called it "Prosteishii sputnik 1" - "Basic
>> satellite 1".
>
> It is summer time (in the Northern hemisphere) and some people might
> have spare time while on vacation.
> A good book on the history of the Russian Space Program was translated
> in English and is available at Amazon for $1.99/volume
>
> Boris Chertok "Rockets and People - Volume I [Kindle Edition]" for $1.99
> http://www.amazon.com/Rockets-People-Volume-I-ebook/dp/B0075GLYQG/
> There are also volumes 2,3 and 4.

[Totally off topic] NASA's History Program Office helped with the
English translation of Chertok's memoirs and a quick googling will
get you the PDFs at NASA. I eyed it at NASA publications last year
but have not got around to reading them.

> The whole Sputnik 1 launch was very ad-hoc and to a some degree an act
> of desperation. The previous tests revealed that the military payload
> that R-7 ICBMs were supposed to carry was disintegrating on reentry
> into dense atmosphere. To buy time to redesign the payload shield and
> to deflect the criticism Sergey Korolev decided to try payload that
> only goes up and does not need to get down. The rest is the History...

IMHO Korolev knew exactly what he was doing. The higher-ups, not
so much. Remember, it was the International Geophysical Year and
both sides had public plans for artificial satellites. The
intended satellite, Sputnik 2, was almost complete, but Vanguard
was a (non-military) competitor and von Braun at Huntsville was
straining at the leash, threatening to do it as soon as he got any
kind of go-ahead. Build a stop-gap, get it orbited quickly. Full
marks to Korolev. :-)

--
Cheers,
Kein-Hong Man (esq.)
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
On Tue, Jul 24, 2012 at 6:53 PM, KHMan <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 7/25/2012 5:50 AM, Leo Razoumov wrote:
>
>> On Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 11:50 PM, Yuri Takhteyev wrote:
>>>
>>> When Korolev's team finally got around
>>> to building one, they called it "Prosteishii sputnik 1" - "Basic
>>> satellite 1".
>>
>>
>> It is summer time (in the Northern hemisphere) and some people might
>> have spare time while on vacation.
>> A good book on the history of the Russian Space Program was translated
>> in English and is available at Amazon for $1.99/volume
>>
>> Boris Chertok "Rockets and People - Volume I [Kindle Edition]" for $1.99
>> http://www.amazon.com/Rockets-People-Volume-I-ebook/dp/B0075GLYQG/
>> There are also volumes 2,3 and 4.
>
>
> [Totally off topic] NASA's History Program Office helped with the English
> translation of Chertok's memoirs and a quick googling will get you the PDFs
> at NASA. I eyed it at NASA publications last year but have not got around to
> reading them.
>
>
>> The whole Sputnik 1 launch was very ad-hoc and to a some degree an act
>> of desperation. The previous tests revealed that the military payload
>> that R-7 ICBMs were supposed to carry was disintegrating on reentry
>> into dense atmosphere. To buy time to redesign the payload shield and
>> to deflect the criticism Sergey Korolev decided to try payload that
>> only goes up and does not need to get down. The rest is the History...
>
>
> IMHO Korolev knew exactly what he was doing. The higher-ups, not so much.
> Remember, it was the International Geophysical Year and both sides had
> public plans for artificial satellites. The intended satellite, Sputnik 2,
> was almost complete, but Vanguard was a (non-military) competitor and von
> Braun at Huntsville was straining at the leash, threatening to do it as soon
> as he got any kind of go-ahead. Build a stop-gap, get it orbited quickly.
> Full marks to Korolev. :-)
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Kein-Hong Man (esq.)
> Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
>

Yeah, Sputnik I went up ... two Vanguard flops ... the Explorer I ...
then Gagarin ... what an exciting time to be an American or a Russian
dreaming of space travel.





--
Twitter: http://twitter.com/znmeb Computational Journalism Studio
http://j.mp/CompJournStudio

Data is the new coal - abundant, dirty and difficult to mine.

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Laurent FAILLIE
>  Yeah, Sputnik I went up ... two Vanguard flops ... the Explorer I ...
> then Gagarin ... what an exciting time to be an American or a Russian
> dreaming of space travel.

Now, thanks to financial's that rule today world ... nobody dreaming anymore.

(well, it's a joke, we are still having innovations but almost no projects that can motivate everybody has space adventure was :( ).
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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

liam mail
On 25 July 2012 10:39, Laurent FAILLIE <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>  Yeah, Sputnik I went up ... two Vanguard flops ... the Explorer I ...
>> then Gagarin ... what an exciting time to be an American or a Russian
>> dreaming of space travel.
>
> Now, thanks to financial's that rule today world ... nobody dreaming
> anymore.
>
> (well, it's a joke, we are still having innovations but almost no projects
> that can motivate everybody has space adventure was :( ).

OK I will go well off topic in this off topic thread.
So you do not see flying to asteroids, Mars with an eventul landing on
Mars as motivating or inspirational ? How about the fast past advances
in computing, maybe tissue engineering which has recently been in the
news, remote exploration of the solar system and beyond, understanding
the system in which we live and the physics of it?

Liam

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Paul Hudson-2
For me, this thread takes the prize for the most off-topic seen on lua-l, which is quite an achievement. Can it continue somewhere else?

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Jeff Pohlmeyer
On Wed, Jul 25, 2012 at 6:04 AM, Paul Hudson wrote:

> For me, this thread takes the prize for the most off-topic seen on lua-l,
> which is quite an achievement.


Yeah, I thought it might be mildly relevant to readers of this list that
Dell has decided to revive their "Linux on the desktop" offerings with a
new web and mobile development platform and that they coincidentally
stepped on the name of a popular Lua project.

I guess my original post must have completely missed the mark, sorry.

 - Jeff

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Re: New meaning of the term "Sputnik"

Dirk Laurie-2
In reply to this post by Paul Hudson-2
2012/7/25 Paul Hudson <[hidden email]>:
> For me, this thread takes the prize for the most off-topic seen on lua-l,
> which is quite an achievement. Can it continue somewhere else?

It's only carrying on for lack of something better, so that we don't have
nothing at all on lua-l.  Give us another topic!

I'ff start the ball rolling.

Q. What's the shortest Lua 5.2 program that prints itself?

- Length is measured by number of characters, blanks included.
- No "require", "dofile" etc: the program must be self-contained.

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