Lua martial art

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Lua martial art

Renato Borges
For those who were curious about the meaning of Lua
related to Martial Arts, take a look at this description
extracted from the article "Hawaiian Lua"
(http://ajjf.org/~ajjf/article03.html):

  "Lua, then, was the general name for a type of
   hand-to-hand fighting which not only included
   hakihaki (bone-breaking), but combined ha'a (dance),
   hakoko (wrestling), mokomoko/ku'i (boxing or punching),
   peku (kicking), aalolo (nerve pressure) to cause
   paralysis, and also the use of weapons."

It also appears in the Martial Arts FAQ:
(http://people.unt.edu/~macaw/m-a/r.m-a.FAQ_files/rmafaq1.html)

> 16.24) Lua
> 
> (Contributor: Stephen Kurtzman - [hidden email])
> 
> Intro: Royal Hawaiian martial art
> 
> Origin: Hawaii
> 
> History: 
> 
> In the 1800s the royal Hawaiian family decreed that the art would be
> restricted to members of the royal Hawaiian family
> (In fact, it is still illegal to practice the art in the state of Hawaii).
> Since the 1980s, the veil of secrecy to non-Hawaiians has started to
> lift with the open teaching of the art in Southern California by Alohe
> Kolomona Kaihewalu. 
> 
> Description: 
> 
> Hawaiian form of combat which resembles Jujutsu in some of its moves.
> The primary emphasis of the art is joint dislocation. 


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Re: Lua martial art

LD Landis
Hi,

  This adds new veracity to the phrase "dumped in the toilet" which I've
  heard as a threat from one fighter to another before hostilities began.

Renato Borges wrote:
> For those who were curious about the meaning of Lua
> related to Martial Arts, take a look at this description
> extracted from the article "Hawaiian Lua"
> (http://ajjf.org/~ajjf/article03.html):
> 
>   "Lua, then, was the general name for a type of
>    hand-to-hand fighting which not only included
>    hakihaki (bone-breaking), but combined ha'a (dance),
>    hakoko (wrestling), mokomoko/ku'i (boxing or punching),
>    peku (kicking), aalolo (nerve pressure) to cause
>    paralysis, and also the use of weapons."
> 
> It also appears in the Martial Arts FAQ:
> (http://people.unt.edu/~macaw/m-a/r.m-a.FAQ_files/rmafaq1.html)
> 
> > 16.24) Lua
> > 
> > (Contributor: Stephen Kurtzman - [hidden email])
> > 
> > Intro: Royal Hawaiian martial art
> > 
> > Origin: Hawaii
> > 
> > History: 
> > 
> > In the 1800s the royal Hawaiian family decreed that the art would be
> > restricted to members of the royal Hawaiian family
> > (In fact, it is still illegal to practice the art in the state of Hawaii).
> > Since the 1980s, the veil of secrecy to non-Hawaiians has started to
> > lift with the open teaching of the art in Southern California by Alohe
> > Kolomona Kaihewalu. 
> > 
> > Description: 
> > 
> > Hawaiian form of combat which resembles Jujutsu in some of its moves.
> > The primary emphasis of the art is joint dislocation. 
> 
> 


-- 
--
Cheers,
	--ldl
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