LUA help

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LUA help

Jeremy P. E. Davis

I downloaded the later versions of LUA from your website, (5.0 and higher) but it’s a “GZ” file and windows 7 won’t let me open it, Is it not usable on windows 7 or should I use a program like notepad to open it?

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Re: LUA help

Francesco Abbate
2011/9/24 Jeremy P. E. Davis <[hidden email]>:
> I downloaded the later versions of LUA from your website, (5.0 and higher)
> but it’s a “GZ” file and windows 7 won’t let me open it, Is it not usable on
> windows 7 or should I use a program like notepad to open it?

Hi Jeremy,

what you found in the Lua website is the archive of the source code of
Lua. The GZ format is the GNU/Linux equivalent of a ZIP file.

Even if you was able to open the file it will be probably useless for
you because it does contain the source code that needs to be compiled
to be executed. The compilation is a complex procedure that require
the installation of several tools and a lot of expertise. In addition,
even if you succeed you will just have Lua available from the command
line without any graphical facility.

I guess that what you need are the Lua binaries for Windows. They are
available, for example, at the following page:

http://code.google.com/p/luaforwindows/

I hope that helps.

Best regards,
--
Francesco

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Re: LUA help

Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
In reply to this post by Jeremy P. E. Davis
> I downloaded the later versions of LUA from your website, (5.0 and higher)
> but it's a "GZ" file and windows 7 won't let me open it, Is it not usable on
> windows 7 or should I use a program like notepad to open it?

As mentioned in the FAQ http://www.lua.org/faq.html#1.1 ,
Chapter 1 of the book Beginning Lua Programming contains detailed
instructions for downloading, building, and installing Lua.
It includes a section on "Dealing with Tarballs and Zip Files":
http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/71/04700691/0470069171.pdf

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Re: LUA help

Paul E. Merrell, J.D.
Probably not needed in this instance, but gunzip files (and many other
archive formats) can be opened on Windows using a file manager that
offers such support. 7-Zip is a great file manager for Windows that
will do the job. Free and open source. <http://www.7-zip.org/>.

Best regards,

Paul

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Re: LUA help

Philippe Lhoste
In reply to this post by Jeremy P. E. Davis
On 24/09/2011 09:54, Jeremy P. E. Davis wrote:
> I downloaded the later versions of LUA from your website, (5.0 and
> higher) but it’s a “GZ” file and windows 7 won’t let me open it, Is it
> not usable on windows 7 or should I use a program like notepad to open it?

For the record (most people on this list are sensible to this...), the
language name is Lua, it is not an acronym.

As said, you should get a good archive manager, and 7-Zip is a great
choice, that's the first thing I install on a new (Windows) computer.
And, beside, as said, you should go directly at the Lua binaries, of
high quality.


And if you want to program in Lua (welcome!), I recommend to use a good
text editor, Notepad being the worst thing you can find in the field... :-)

I personally use SciTE[1], but some people can find it a bit... rustic,
as you don't have classical options/settings dialog but instead powerful
text files for fine grained settings. One advantage of SciTE is that it
uses Lua as scripting language!

Another good choice, more "classical", is Notepad++[2], based on the
same edit component, so with great support of Lua.

Of course, both are free, and even open source. And there are many
alternatives, everybody has a personal opinion on their favorite editor.

Happy Lua hacking, and don't hesitate to ask questions here, people are
friendly and helpful.

[1] http://www.scintilla.org/
[2] http://notepad-plus-plus.org/en/


--
Philippe Lhoste
--  (near) Paris -- France
--  http://Phi.Lho.free.fr
--  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --


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Re: LUA help

Stefan Reich
Incidentally, IntelliJ IDEA has a Lua module now. (I love IDEA more
than my own grandmother so I never cease recommending it to everyone.)

The Lua module is not as super-polished as the Java section of the
IDE... but it does work quite well. (Don't know how it stacks up to
the other solutions.) And I can manage Java and Lua in one project
which is obviously neat for my Java-Lua happy-marriage-thingie.

> it’s a “GZ” file

A note to the OP: You might consider setting up a virtual Linux PC
(through VirtualBox) in your Windows 7. Just play around with it,
you're safe, you can't break anything. It's fun and you will get
accustomed to Unix file formats like GZ in no time. Incidentally, I
have a Lua-oriented Linux distribution under development that you
might like to give a spin (incredibly how I sneaked that one in, eh?
:)).

Cheers,
Stefan

On Sun, Sep 25, 2011 at 12:53 PM, Philippe Lhoste <[hidden email]> wrote:

> And if you want to program in Lua (welcome!), I recommend to use a good text
> editor, Notepad being the worst thing you can find in the field... :-)
>
> I personally use SciTE[1], but some people can find it a bit... rustic, as
> you don't have classical options/settings dialog but instead powerful text
> files for fine grained settings. One advantage of SciTE is that it uses Lua
> as scripting language!

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Re: LUA help

Dirk Laurie
In reply to this post by Philippe Lhoste
On Sun, Sep 25, 2011 at 02:53:28PM +0200, Philippe Lhoste wrote:
>
> As said, you should get a good archive manager, and 7-Zip is a great
> choice, that's the first thing I install on a new (Windows) computer.

Second, in my case. PuTTY is first.

D.

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Re: LUA help

Philippe Lhoste
On 25/09/2011 16:10, Dirk Laurie wrote:
> Second, in my case. PuTTY is first.

I need 7-Zip to open the archive of PuTTY: I deactivate the Zip support
of XP or more as soon as I can (that, and showing file extensions, and
many other tweaks). ^_^

--
Philippe Lhoste
--  (near) Paris -- France
--  http://Phi.Lho.free.fr
--  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --


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Re: LUA help

Elias Barrionovo
Interesting enough, there's also vim  and Gedit for Windows.
Gedit [1] doesn't look native (it's created with the gtk toolkit), but
I usually don't care about native looks. And vim [2] is a great editor
that works through the command line. Not sure how it works on windows,
but I know some folks who use it there.

Anyway, just my 2 cents...

[1] http://projects.gnome.org/gedit/
[2] http://www.vim.org/

--
NI!

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Re: LUA help

Jeff Pohlmeyer
On Sun, Sep 25, 2011 at 2:29 PM, Elias Barrionovo wrote:

> Interesting enough, there's also vim  and Gedit for Windows.

There is also a long list of Lua-friendly editors at [1].
Of course I am a bit biased, but [2] is my personal favorite.

[1] http://lua-users.org/wiki/LuaEditorSupport
[2] http://code.google.com/p/fxite/


 - Jeff

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Re: LUA help

Philippe Lhoste
On 26/09/2011 06:04, Jeff Pohlmeyer wrote:
> [2] http://code.google.com/p/fxite/

Ah, an interesting editor. I haven't seen so much real-world Fox-based applications on
Windows, so far.
A bit big (the Fox toolkit is probably the culprit) but I appreciate it is only one file.
The look is a bit rustic (the open dialog is quite dated) and it has some show-stoppers (I
am used to open documents by drag'n'dropping them from Explorer to the editor window) but
the list of features is impressive, and I appreciate it can be scripted in Lua too.

Another editor worth mentioning in the Lua world is Textadept [1] which is even bigger
(coming with the whole GTK+ stack!) but has the interesting property of being almost
entirely written in Lua (with a dash of C for low level operations).

[1] http://code.google.com/p/textadept/

Both editors use Scintilla as base component, which is a good choice, if I may say so...
:-)

--
Philippe Lhoste
--  (near) Paris -- France
--  http://Phi.Lho.free.fr
--  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --  --


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Re: LUA help

steve donovan
On Mon, Sep 26, 2011 at 11:06 AM, Philippe Lhoste <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Another editor worth mentioning in the Lua world is Textadept [1] which is
> even bigger (coming with the whole GTK+ stack!) but has the interesting
> property of being almost entirely written in Lua (with a dash of C for low
> level operations).

It is very entertaining to hack, and is an option for OS X as well
because michell maintains it across all three major platforms.  It
feels like Emacs in some ways, very keyboard-shortcut driven with
split panes.  The code completion is pretty good for Lua.  Not as
mature as SciTE but it's still young.

While we're talking editors, Neil Hodgson has released a native port
of SciTE for OS X, but it will only be available through the App Store
and costs money (about $40 I think)

steve d.