History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

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History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Bret Mogilefsky-4
(Regarding http://www.lua.org/history.html... Go read it now if you
haven't!) 

Hello...

I am quite flattered at being included in this paper... I didn't know that
Grim Fandango was the first game you knew to be using Lua!

One detail not included is that Rob Huebner, also at LucasArts at the time,
is largely responsible for it catching on with game developers so quickly.
Rob was one of the engine programmers on the game Jedi Knight, and had
already received quite a bit of notoriety for working on Descent, also a
huge hit.  Rob gave a talk at the Game Developer's Conference in San Jose,
CA (I'm unsure of the year, but I think it's 1998... will have to check)
about using scripting languages in games.  It was quite heavily attended,
probably 200 or 300 people in the room.  Rob talked at length about the
benefits but also all the complexity of writing your own language from
scratch, and went through lexing, parsing, analysis, compiling,
etc. etc. in good detail.  (JK's scripting language looked a lot like C
without loops.)

Lots of the people in the room had never taken a compiler course.  Near the
end of his talk many game programmers looked quite discouraged, realizing
that a decent scripting language was not something you could whip up
overnight, especially your first time out.  As the questions started, he
pointed out that you can take pre-existing language interpreters and get
much quicker results, specifically mentioning Lua.  He talked about Grim
and pointed me out in the audience, and I stood up and gave a brief blurb
about Lua.  Between us we said that it only took a day to embed, codebase
was clear and easy to modify, was small and fast, extensible, easy to pick
up for designers, etc. People lit up and furiously started scribbling notes
and looked really excited.  I got a few inquiries afterwards, but game
developers being who they are, most of them just went out and checked it
out on their own.  Soon enough the list was overflowing with game
programmer inquiries...

So though it's not much of an academic conference, you can say that we
"presented" about our experiences with Lua there.  If Rob hadn't mentioned
it to so many game programmers interested in the topic, it probably would
have taken a lot longer for it to catch on... I believe Rob also mentioned
it in a talk another year about his experiences embedding Java into
Vampire: The Masquerade (for Nihilistic).

There was a panel discussion about scripting languages at the GDC again
this year, and one of the people on the panel was Kevin Bruner, who was the
other engine programmer on GF.  He talked a lot about the "non-scripting"
scripting language he's using in Obi-Wan now, but also mentioned comparable
experiences with Lua on Grim.  Again, lots of interest, giving Lua good
exposure.

(It should be noted that people in the audience who were trying to use Lua
were generally concerned about how to amortize the gabage collection cost
as their framerates went up, something that's come up on the list quite a
bit.  This suggests that after co-routines, putting more of garbage
collection into the meta-mechanisms might be a good way to go...)

Some of you robotics and other embedded device engineers better start
mentioning Lua at your own conferences, or pretty soon you'll hear nothing
but games games games on this list forever...  =)

Thanks again to the authors for making Lua available.  I enjoy watching it
evolve and proliferate and this is consistently one of the highest quality
mailing lists I'm on.


Bret

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Quick toLua feature request

Eric Ries
It turns out that having the function toluaI_reg_types() named the same
across many toLua output files is causing trouble with our build process. Is
there any reason that we can't change the naming convention to something
like:

toluaI_PackageName_reg_types()

which fits a bit better with the naming convention used in the rest of the
file anyway.

Any thoughts?

Eric


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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
In reply to this post by Bret Mogilefsky-4
>I am quite flattered at being included in this paper... I didn't know that
>Grim Fandango was the first game you knew to be using Lua!

Thanks for using Lua in Grim Fandango and helping Lua to be known in the
game community. And thanks for the details on how you spread the word on Lua.

We have this problem: we *feel* that Lua is being used in many places
but we don't *know* any other than the 50 or so listed in our site.

Is it just a feeling or what? How widely would you say that Lua is used?
--lhf

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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

John Belmonte-2
In reply to this post by Bret Mogilefsky-4
Bret Mogilefsky wrote:

> (It should be noted that people in the audience who were trying to use Lua
> were generally concerned about how to amortize the gabage collection cost
> as their framerates went up, something that's come up on the list quite a
> bit.

Well, that was me...  I wouldn't want my take on Lua garbage collection to
be counted twice.



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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
In reply to this post by Bret Mogilefsky-4
I wrote this last week:

 We have this problem: we *feel* that Lua is being used in many places
 but we don't *know* any other than the 50 or so listed in our site.

 Is it just a feeling or what? How widely would you say that Lua is used?

This appeared yesterday in comp.games.development:

 Of course, the most popular extension languages (Lua, Python, Tcl)
 are licensed without such strings attached.

So, at least to this person, Lua rates among the "most popular" languages!
(With Lua listed first, but he may have sorted the names...)

This kind of statement is not infrequent in usenet messages that mention Lua
(see "Lua usenet citations" in http://www.lua.org/links.html ); Lua is
mentioned as a language that people are (or should be) familiar with.
Despite this, we still only know those 50 or so uses listed in our site.

What is your experience? Do people around you know Lua? How did they know about
it? Did you tell them yourself or was it the other way around? Do you know
other people that are using Lua but who are not in lua-l? Would you rate Lua
as a "popular" language? Do you see its popularity increasing?

We'd really like to know a realistic estimate of the impact of Lua.

Thanks for any info.
--lhf

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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Steve Dekorte-4

Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo wrote:
...Do people around you know Lua? How did they know about it?

Btw, what ever happened to the Lua t-shirts?

Steve

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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Jean-Claude Wippler
In reply to this post by Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo <[hidden email]> wrote:

>I wrote this last week:
>
> We have this problem: we *feel* that Lua is being used in many places
> but we don't *know* any other than the 50 or so listed in our site.
>
> Is it just a feeling or what? How widely would you say that Lua is used?

You could:
 - track the download numbers
 - track the volume of messages on this list
 - count the number of "Lua + scripting" hits in a search engine
 - count the number of "Lua rules" hits in a search engine
 - offer some formal support and count how many people contact you

But... does it matter?  Or to put it differently: once you find out, what
would you do with that knowledge?

-jcw


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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Garth Dighton
In reply to this post by Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
I can say that the latest version of Kamband, an Angband variant
(Angband is a roguelike game), added support for Lua scripting, although
no actual scripts have been written yet. This version came out only last
week, and I was pleasantly surprised. The development team of Zangband,
another variant, have been talking about adding Python support for at
least a year, and then someone comes along and adds Lua to their version
in very short order, instead of talking about it.

I myself am working on a roguelike (not really an Angband variant, but
Angband-inspired) which is almost entirely written in Lua. So far, the
only C portions are Line-of-sight, Pathfinding, and the actual display
code.


-- 
Garth Dighton

Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo wrote:
> 
> I wrote this last week:
> 
>  We have this problem: we *feel* that Lua is being used in many places
>  but we don't *know* any other than the 50 or so listed in our site.
> 
>  Is it just a feeling or what? How widely would you say that Lua is used?
> 
> This appeared yesterday in comp.games.development:
> 
>  Of course, the most popular extension languages (Lua, Python, Tcl)
>  are licensed without such strings attached.
> 
> So, at least to this person, Lua rates among the "most popular" languages!
> (With Lua listed first, but he may have sorted the names...)
> 
> This kind of statement is not infrequent in usenet messages that mention Lua
> (see "Lua usenet citations" in http://www.lua.org/links.html ); Lua is
> mentioned as a language that people are (or should be) familiar with.
> Despite this, we still only know those 50 or so uses listed in our site.
> 
> What is your experience? Do people around you know Lua? How did they know about
> it? Did you tell them yourself or was it the other way around? Do you know
> other people that are using Lua but who are not in lua-l? Would you rate Lua
> as a "popular" language? Do you see its popularity increasing?
> 
> We'd really like to know a realistic estimate of the impact of Lua.
> 
> Thanks for any info.
> --lhf

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Lua Strengths/Weaknesses and usage info

David Jeske-3
In reply to this post by Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 09:23:31PM -0300, Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo wrote:
> What is your experience?

I'll summarize at the top and save people time. This isn't all
positive towards Lua, but it's all good information. Of course this is
all in my humble personal opinion.

Lua's biggest strengths are:

 - ease of integration (the lua C api is simple and powerful)
 - execution speed     (the lua VM is very fast)

The biggest troubles I've had using Lua are:

 - using my add-in class machinery is very error prone because 
   the syntax is all based on tables and functions.

   (anyone have any good syntax for classes??)

 - combination of add-in class machinery and weak typing makes
   my Lua code hard to understand and makes errors hard to
   report about and thus hard to track down.

I (obviously) wouldn't have either of those problems if I were using
Lua for some simple configuration and simple scripting like it's
sort-of intended.

Ironically, the part of a project where I did use Lua as a simple
configuration language basically had a form of "type checking" built
in so that I could give specific errors when lines of the
configuration were invalid before trying to startup the program. (I
did this by overriding setglobal) It was just too troublesome when an
invalid script setting would just cause some random error at runtime.

------ and now onto the details:

I've used Lua primarily in two places:

1) A board level manufacturing diagnostic for the 3dfx VooDoo Banshee

   It allowed me to separate the 'unsafe' C code from the 'safe' lua
   code. Since it was a board level manufacturing diagnostic, it had to
   run in DOS (with a protected mode extender), and debugging in that
   environment was not fun, so the less code with segfaul type errors 
   the better. Once I got the core routines exported to Lua, I could
   iteratively get the proper tests working and sequenced the way
   we needed them. Also, all the text-UI for the operator was in Lua,
   more code I didn't have to deal with C-level stuff in.

   It also allowed me to do on-site customization while working with
   manufacturers. 

   This project worked well, and tested every Voodoo Banshee and
   probably all of the VooDoo3 based boards which shipped.

   The biggest drawback of using Lua was that I don't think the people
   who took it over from me appreciated having to learn the script
   language complexity. They probably would have rather had some straight
   C-code. I can't know for sure.

2) A free/unfinished game engine (HZ). 

   This project actually came first and is where I gained positive 
   experience using Lua. However, the game is just a pet-project which 
   does not get enough attention from me. Compared to other languages 
   available (then and now) Lua is much simpler and faster as an 
   embedded extension language.

   Right now I'm actually removing Lua from this project, since I've again
   run into trouble where people just don't understand the project to
   help contribute, and having it half C++, half Lua dosn't help. I also
   think I integrated Lua too early in the project, since I've confused
   myself about where I want the C++/Lua boundary. (Lua isn't really what
   I want to code the _entire_ game in -- because of speed and code
   maintainability, but that's where it's gone right now)

   I do think this was an interesting project to learn from.
   The troubles with Lua in this project have been: (a) It's weak typed,
   and debugging is somewhat difficult in the context of a game where 
   I've not built an interactive Lua debugger. (b) It's hard for others to
   understand the Lua code, both because it's weak typed, and because 
   (like all class-ish lua) I had to build my own inheritence mechanism and 
   the weird syntax makes the code more confusing. 

> Do people around you know Lua? 

A friend of mine experimented it with at his work in digital effects
production. They primarily use Python for scripting tools, and C/C++
for writing custom code which integrates into something else or
renders something. He made a plug-in shader module of some kind using
Lua. He wrote it because using this plug-in allowed him to iteratively
work on the shader without quitting and restarting the environment to
load a new compiled shared object. He thought it was very easy to
learn the Lua API and integrate it into what he was doing, but he
wasn't that pleased with the language and he hasn't used that plug-in
or Lua since.

I have at least two or three other friends who have learned it at some
point. The only one of which who did anything with it was Paul Bleisch
who at least used to be on lua-l.

> How did they know about it? Did you tell them yourself or was it the
> other way around?

In the case of my friend in digital production, I told him about it.

> Do you know other people that are using Lua but who are not in
> lua-l?

Nope.

> Would you rate Lua as a "popular" language? Do you see its
> popularity increasing?

I definetly see it's popularity increasing compared to when I first
stumbled upon it around 1997. Back then nobody knew what it was. Now
several of my friends know what it is, and occasionally someone I run
into knows what it is.

The scripting language I use the most is Python, and it's popularity
is clearly increasing alot more than Lua's. 

If writing mostly in script, I would always start in Python over Lua
because I love the clean syntax, and if something was a performance
problem I'd write C modules later. If integrating a scripting language
to do very small things in a larger C/C++ program I'd probably
continue to use Lua purely for the ease of the API. (interestingly,
I've never tried to use Python in this context)

Although for most of my projects I'm really starting to want a
static-typed scripting environment. Unfortunatly, there dosn't seem to
be one readily available. Java comes close but isn't easy to
integrate, Pike dosn't have enough static type checking (yet?) despite
all it's static declarations. Something like UnrealScript would be
pretty great, too bad that's not freely available.

-- 
David Jeske (N9LCA) + http://www.chat.net/~jeske/ + [hidden email]


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RE: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Dirk Ringe
In reply to this post by Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
There are some game projects that use lua and are not registered on your
site. I know of at least three AAA game titles here in germany (one
released, two others not yet released) that make use of lua as scripting
language. I can't tell you about the other two projects (it's their choice
to registrate not mine), but I just submitted the data for our game *g*

Greets,

 Dirk



-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[[hidden email] Behalf Of Luiz Henrique de
Figueiredo
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 2:24 AM
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!


I wrote this last week:

 We have this problem: we *feel* that Lua is being used in many places
 but we don't *know* any other than the 50 or so listed in our site.

 Is it just a feeling or what? How widely would you say that Lua is used?

This appeared yesterday in comp.games.development:

 Of course, the most popular extension languages (Lua, Python, Tcl)
 are licensed without such strings attached.

So, at least to this person, Lua rates among the "most popular" languages!
(With Lua listed first, but he may have sorted the names...)

This kind of statement is not infrequent in usenet messages that mention Lua
(see "Lua usenet citations" in http://www.lua.org/links.html ); Lua is
mentioned as a language that people are (or should be) familiar with.
Despite this, we still only know those 50 or so uses listed in our site.

What is your experience? Do people around you know Lua? How did they know
about
it? Did you tell them yourself or was it the other way around? Do you know
other people that are using Lua but who are not in lua-l? Would you rate Lua
as a "popular" language? Do you see its popularity increasing?

We'd really like to know a realistic estimate of the impact of Lua.

Thanks for any info.
--lhf



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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Ritesh Rughoobeer
we are researching lua as a means for our game to interpret scenes from our scenario editor, and to control the movement of the character from the character editor.. as well as control the animations, and everything that happens in the game... going slow though...
 
 
Regards,
 
Ritesh Rughoobeer
Programmer
VLS, UND

Email: [hidden email]
ICQ: 89021941
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 10:01 AM
Subject: RE: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

There are some game projects that use lua and are not registered on your
site. I know of at least three AAA game titles here in germany (one
released, two others not yet released) that make use of lua as scripting
language. I can't tell you about the other two projects (it's their choice
to registrate not mine), but I just submitted the data for our game *g*

Greets,

 Dirk



-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]]On Behalf Of Luiz Henrique de
Figueiredo
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 2:24 AM
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!


I wrote this last week:

 We have this problem: we *feel* that Lua is being used in many places
 but we don't *know* any other than the 50 or so listed in our site.

 Is it just a feeling or what? How widely would you say that Lua is used?

This appeared yesterday in comp.games.development:

 Of course, the most popular extension languages (Lua, Python, Tcl)
 are licensed without such strings attached.

So, at least to this person, Lua rates among the "most popular" languages!
(With Lua listed first, but he may have sorted the names...)

This kind of statement is not infrequent in usenet messages that mention Lua
(see "Lua usenet citations" in http://www.lua.org/links.html ); Lua is
mentioned as a language that people are (or should be) familiar with.
Despite this, we still only know those 50 or so uses listed in our site.

What is your experience? Do people around you know Lua? How did they know
about
it? Did you tell them yourself or was it the other way around? Do you know
other people that are using Lua but who are not in lua-l? Would you rate Lua
as a "popular" language? Do you see its popularity increasing?

We'd really like to know a realistic estimate of the impact of Lua.

Thanks for any info.
--lhf

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RE: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Vincent Penquerc'h-3
In reply to this post by Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
> What is your experience? Do people around you know Lua? How did
> they know about
> it? Did you tell them yourself or was it the other way around? Do you know
> other people that are using Lua but who are not in lua-l? Would

There is a link to Lua at www.allegro.cc, the home for a number of
independant beginner game developpers, and I once had someone exchanging
a few mails with me for some info about getting started with Lua for
such a game. The download count reads 177 now, though this gives little
indication of how many people actually tried it or are using it.

I've heard of a couple other game companies using Lua too, not in the
list of projects at TecGraf, though I don't know to what extent.

Also, I was involved in the genesis of an AI library, and I managed to
get people settling on Lua as a scripting language (people wanted to
use XML (!) as a *scripting* language. how odd...). Unfortunately, the
list kind of died due to insufficient time, during the conception phase.
This could have been a very nice use for Lua. At least this prompted a
few people to have a look at Lua, and I think they were nicely surprised
by its capabilities :)

--
Vincent Penquerc'h


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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo
In reply to this post by Bret Mogilefsky-4
>You could:
> - track the download numbers
> - track the volume of messages on this list
> - count the number of "Lua + scripting" hits in a search engine

We do all this. We removed the web mirrors at IMPA and Waterloo to try to
concentrate all traffic at www.lua.org (plus it was a hassle to keep 4 web
sites updated).

> - offer some formal support and count how many people contact you

We get very little mail at lua@tecgraf (except for a lot of spam).
I guess most of the questions go to lua-l.

>But... does it matter?  Or to put it differently: once you find out, what
>would you do with that knowledge?

It *does* matter. As we say in the site:

 Evidence that Lua is being widely used helps to ensure further support
 for developing Lua at TeCGraf.

Lua is not a project with its own budget, not even at TeCGraf.
Lua is our (=roberto+celes+lhf) project. In the very least, we can use this
information to show that Lua has an impact and that it's worth to finance us
so that we can keep developing Lua. This helps us get/keep research fellowships
(and the occasional prize :-) ...

Thank you all for your Lua stories. Keep them coming.
--lhf

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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Alex Sandro Queiroz e Silva
In reply to this post by Garth Dighton
Hallo,

On Tue, 15 May 2001, Garth Dighton wrote:

> I myself am working on a roguelike (not really an Angband variant, but
> Angband-inspired) which is almost entirely written in Lua. So far, the
> only C portions are Line-of-sight, Pathfinding, and the actual display
> code.

	I'm using Lua as a scripting language for a renderer I'm writing
(http://sourceforge.net/projects/virtuality/). I've chosen Lua because
it'll allow me to both describe the scenes, using the table constructs,
and write custom shaders just like RenderMan.
	Currently I've coded just a few primitives (Sphere, Box, Torus,
Plane, Triangle, Cylinder) and I'm writing the code to support Lua
shaders.

  --Alex	[hidden email]		Lab. de Computação Gráfica/UFC
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|"Minha força vem da solidão. Não tenho medo das chuvas tempestuosas nem das |
| grandes ventanias soltas, pois eu também sou o escuro da noite."	     |
|	- Clarice Lispector						     |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+


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t-shirts [was Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!]

Roberto Ierusalimschy
In reply to this post by Steve Dekorte-4
> Btw, what ever happened to the Lua t-shirts?

First, I lost my office.

Since I got my office back, I am trying to find some spare time to handle 
the task. I still don't know how to get the payments. I was thinking about 
geting Amazon gift certificates. Is that too stupid?

-- Roberto

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Re: Lua Strengths/Weaknesses and usage info

Reuben Thomas-4
In reply to this post by David Jeske-3
>  - using my add-in class machinery is very error prone because
>    the syntax is all based on tables and functions.

This is an instance of the more general problem that Lua's syntax is not
extensible (at least, not "natively"). By and large, the arguments against
extending syntax on the grounds of lack of usability, language fragmentation
&c. are bogus if you agree that the semantic extension mechanisms are valid.
OTOH, there would be serious concerns about performance and the usability of
such mechanisms, which would have to be addressed, e.g. making sure you
didn't get a compiler that looped or bombed out.

However, these aren't insoluble problems.

>  - combination of add-in class machinery and weak typing makes
>    my Lua code hard to understand and makes errors hard to
>    report about and thus hard to track down.

This is something that ought to be possible to address more with tag methods
(possibly ones that don't exist yet). For example, by having a tag method
for assignment (at the moment there's just setglobal and settable, and no
way of catching assignments to locals), you could have Euphoria-like typing
(www.rapideuphoria.com): you can check that the value being assigned is of
the relevant type, and raise an error if not.

To make this really convenient, a nicer syntax for declarations would be
good, so you can say "[local] [<type>] <variable>", rather than having to
call settag. Also, you'd need to be able to tag any value, not just tables
and userdata (e.g. to do dates and times conveniently).

> I would always start in Python over Lua because I love the clean syntax

How's it cleaner? The use of indenting rather than keywords or punctuation?
Lua's pretty clean...

It does seem from this that stronger typing mechanisms would be a good thing
in Lua, and I'd certainly like to see such things. In particular, perhaps
it's time to think in terms of another level up: rather than implementing
everything in the core, one could, using the existing and perhaps new
meta-mechanisms, implement a typed version of Lua, thus keeping both the
purists who want Lua to stay stable and light happy, as well as those who
want a programming language suitable for bigger projects.

Standard ML may be a good model here: it consists of two essentially
orthogonal languages: the expression language and the module language. Of
course the whole of ML is strongly statically typed, but in Lua perhaps we
could think in terms of an expression language and a type language, where
the latter includes both types and modules (which can be seen as the same
thing at different levels of granularity).

-- 
http://sc3d.org/rrt/ | Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. (Anon)


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Re: t-shirts [was Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!]

Luc Van den Borre-2
In reply to this post by Roberto Ierusalimschy
| Since I got my office back, I am trying to find some spare time to handle
| the task. I still don't know how to get the payments. I was thinking about
| geting Amazon gift certificates. Is that too stupid?

You could consider http://www.cafepress.com/
They've got a program where you upload your graphic and set a price, they take
care of the rest. They seem to be pretty reliable, a lot of websites are using
them.

--Luc


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RE: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Ignacio Castaño
In reply to this post by Dirk Ringe
Dirk Ringe wrote:
> There are some game projects that use lua and are not registered on your
> site. I know of at least three AAA game titles here in germany (one
> released, two others not yet released) that make use of lua as scripting
> language. I can't tell you about the other two projects (it's their choice
> to registrate not mine), but I just submitted the data for our game *g*

I was working at crytek (a young game company, see: www.crytek.de), on the Engalus project, and we
were using lua for scripted events, and config files, but unfortunately it was cancelled, so I never
reported it. However, I believe that crytek is still using lua for other projects, but I cannot say
for sure.


Ignacio Castano
[hidden email]



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RE: t-shirts [was Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!]

Eric Ries
In reply to this post by Roberto Ierusalimschy
Paypal?

> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email]
> [[hidden email] Behalf Of Roberto
> Ierusalimschy
> Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 9:20 AM
> To: Multiple recipients of list
> Subject: t-shirts [was Re: History of Lua aside... note about game
> usage!]
>
>
> > Btw, what ever happened to the Lua t-shirts?
>
> First, I lost my office.
>
> Since I got my office back, I am trying to find some spare time to handle
> the task. I still don't know how to get the payments. I was
> thinking about
> geting Amazon gift certificates. Is that too stupid?
>
> -- Roberto


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Re: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!

Marco Corbetta
In reply to this post by Ignacio Castaño
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ignacio Castano" <[hidden email]>
To: "Multiple recipients of list" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 6:23 PM
Subject: RE: History of Lua aside... note about game usage!


> Dirk Ringe wrote:
> > There are some game projects that use lua and are not registered on your
> > site. I know of at least three AAA game titles here in germany (one
> > released, two others not yet released) that make use of lua as scripting
> > language. I can't tell you about the other two projects (it's their
choice
> > to registrate not mine), but I just submitted the data for our game *g*
>
> I was working at crytek (a young game company, see: www.crytek.de), on the
Engalus project, and we
> were using lua for scripted events, and config files, but unfortunately it
was cancelled, so I never
> reported it. However, I believe that crytek is still using lua for other
projects, but I cannot say
> for sure.

Yes, we're using Lua for our new game,X-Isle,sold in bundle with NVidia's
GeForce3 card.
But our project is not included in the list since I'm still working on the
scripting system and my current approach to simulate multitasking with Lua
4.0 is not definitive yet... This means that maybe we can
drop Lua and switch to something else, so...
However 'till now my impression is that Lua is very nice and I'm using Lua
to setup and control the behaviors of the entities in our game.
As soon as we switch definitely to Lua I'll submit the informations for our
game.
Btw I'm waiting for Lua 4.1 , and I'd like to read more information (if
possible) about this new Lua version.

Ciao,

Marco Corbetta
Lead Programmer
Crytek Studios Inc.
www.crytek.com


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